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and civil rights leader, clarence mitchell iii, details on the death and one of the state's most prominent political families. game four of the alds. we hope the o's can pull out a win. now your maryland lottery midday numbers. >> ♪ the maryland lottery, let yourself play ♪ >> go o's. et's go to your pick three game. 5. 3. final numbers, 3. 5, 3, 3. we will get to your pick four in a moment. the latest ravens fan is katie from laurel, delaware. she won $6,000. find out how you can become a fan of the game. all set and ready to go with your four numbers. 0. 3. 0. last number, 9. 0, 3, 0, 9. the maryland lottery, let yourself play. >> thank you so much for joining us for 11 news at noon. we want to remind you to watch tonight. [captioning made possible by barnhill: you hear a lot of talk about question seven... so let me tell you what i know: if question seven passes, my company's going to... bring table games, like blackjack and poker... right here to baltimore. a twenty-five million dollar investment... that'll create five hundred new jobs. all right here. today, marylanders are spendi
like you also thought the civil rights movement for african-americans took the opportunity of the franchise to run for office. if you don't like those laws, you become a lawmaker. >> become part of the solution. i think that's -- i want to just say about president obama, he's one of the reasons that people are so mobilized by himment you can identify with him on multiple levels. i like to think of president obama as an immigrant. certainly a child of an immigrant. there are multiple levels at which you can identify with that and it gave people his election also mobilized a lot of different folks to feel that something was possible. >> certainly a cosmopolitan citizen having lived in schools, indonesia, a half sister who was indonesian. as well as american like. that idea of a cosmopolitan person is part what the immigrant story is. grace, i wish you great luck in your campaign. thank you, sayu, robert and chloe are back for me. next we're talking about affirmative action. jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the cit
, history of labor in the 20th century, one of the great triumphs of the civil rights era was for people to recognize -- for white labor to recognize that as long as black laborers were excluded from unions they were undercutting white labor as well. >> it took a while. >> it did. it took 60 years actually. so when you see this kind of cynical advertising, they're trying to use that same ploy using african-americans. and if we had any doubt about the inter-related struggles, let's look at this one issue. how many times have we seen politicians get into trouble because they had nannies who were not being paid or being paid under the tashlgs being exploited. if we look back, we don't have to go to hollywood, we don't -- >> go home. >> look back to the history. half a century ago, that exploited domestic labor would have been black women. >> that's right. >> these are the same struggles. >> absolutely. i so appreciate that. that's part of why next i get to talk about the smartest thing i have read about black folks and the presidency of president obama in four years. we're going to talk abo
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
of civil rights, when first elected, he was one of the nation's youngest legislators. his son was also a delicate and is now a radio host here at wbal. >> i celebrate the great live that my father lived. the story he presented to all of us who are beneficiaries of his public policy initiative. >> his nephew says his uncle was a man like no other. he taught him about politics. >> he taught us what it meant to campaign, let's just say. he taught us how to knock on doors. he taught us to be close to people peeping he taught us about organization. you cannot just go out there and put your name on the ballot and expect people to votes. he said you always have to stay close to the people. he was the consummate politician and the consummate campaigner. >> but there were hard times. he served 16 months in federal prison after being convicted in 1987 of influence peddling. >> he had a smile on his face. he was just stronger. you know, they are not going to beat me down. he refused to let people beat him down. and even up into his passing, he was fighting. i saw him last week. >> no one's life i
on a engagement tour with my civil rights organization, national action network. we're making sure that everyone gets their voice heard in 28 days. but the right wing is trying to scare voters away. look at this bulletin board. it's popping up in minority neighborhoods in milwaukie, wisconsin. with the big headline -- voter fraud is a felony. three years in prison $10,000 fine. and the woman on the right telling us -- we voted illegally. >>> in ohio this billboard is in a black neighborhood around cleveland. they went up last week just as early voting started. voting fraud is a felony 3 1/2 years, $10,000 fine. a private family foundation is reportedly behind them. what that means is a mystery. we tried to find out who they are. so far they haven't responded to our requests. city councilwoman fill is cleveland is determined to get answers. >> this is clearly an attempt at voter intimidation. i want to find out who this foundation is who paid for it, number one. they need to show their hand as well. you can't send intimidating messages to people. >> they're do
of violating their civil rights by coercing their confessions. the city has defended 9 way it's conducted its investigation. the filmmaker refuse to share outtakes citing shield laws. >> we believe we are protected under the shield laws as journalists and we don't think it's fair for the government to intrude in our research. >> reporter: a lawyer for the city says the film isn't journalism because it advocates for the five. in a statement, the city says, quote, if the plaintiffs truly want an open airing of the facts, they should encourage the filmmakers not to hide anything. the filmmakers claim the documentary sticks to the facts. what do you make of the city trying to go after the outtakes for this film? >> the city needs to stop dragging their feet. i don't think they would find anything other than what they already know, that we were innocent and this is just going to continue to further restate that. >> reporter: yusef says no matter the outcome, he may never fully escape his nightmare that started in in park. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. >>> the world watches cape canaveral, florid
, okay he has the polls. today is a big day for many latinos and many civil rights and labor activists. the fact he dedicates this national monument on a day like today and the fact yes, we can can came from the united workers is a big deal, and it's a message to the latino community. >> each family has their own individuali issues. each person has factors that determine how engaged they are in the campaign, whether they can get out to vote and who they will vote for. generically speaking here, if you had to explain why there's this enthusiasm gap, if these numbers are accurate, what is the problem? >> i think you can look at it from what the gop has not done. i was speaking to a political scientist today who said in some states like nevada and colorado, the anti-immigrant rhetoric hurt in a year that they could have had more latino votes. the economy is not doing that well. >> i get when you look at arizona, why someone would be concerned and perhaps not support a jan brewer, given her actions in front of the mike and behind in her office when she signs legislation. i'm talking about
himself to the naacp in the civil rights era in which there were secret donations were allowed. but of course rove is not martin luther king jr. >> cenk: really? yeah to say the least. >> people were fascinated like king was fighting for equal rights and rove and billionaires are fighting for tax breaks. not quite the same. >> cenk: it doesn't matter if you break the laws as the bush administration did because president obama looks forward he doesn't look backwards. he's going let you get away with anything anyway, he's encouraged by that, if you ask me. carl unger, thank you for "boss rove"." >> thank for having me, cenk. >> cenk: someone is not taking what the republicans are dishing out. the family of a navy seal who was actually killed in libya strikes back. >> one was a former navy seal, and glen doherty and you can imagine how shocked i was to learn that he was one of the two navy--former navy seals killed in bengahzi. >> cenk: wait until you see how shocked he is when his mom said, cut it out. i don't want you to talk about him any more. and then mark hamill. look at thi
and immigrants, whether it's civil rights, those things are on the line. and i just hope we don't see a repeat in the debate tomorrow night of the shame of that first debate where hispanics is and women and gay people and african-americans didn't even seem to exist in domestic policy. >> so, this is irreversible damage, for suburban women. would you agree with that, terry? >> oh, absolutely. i think suburban women are going -- are not going to vote for mitt romney. i think they see right through his deception. and i think that they actually, it's incredibly offensive and demeaning to women to treat us as if we're so stupid that we would believe this kind of hoaxerism. we're looking for a president that we can take at his word. barack obama is pro-choice and he means it when he says he's pro-choice. mitt romney will say anything and do anything and he is not the right president for women. >> i think all of us in our lifetime come across people who do business deals and they will say anything they possibly can to get the deal, close the deal at closing, and mitt romney comes off as one of these
. the baltimore circuit courthouse is naaeddafter him, the latt civil rights leaderr and loobyist for the naacp." mitccell's 25- year political career came to an end after peddling in 1987.he ended up spending a year aad a half in friend:"to be honest with you, i don't think it did change him. i think, for a brief but, hh was alwwys there to . - &plend aavice."mitchell's legac continues witt his family... many involved in public life. his son, cllrence the foorth,, was lso a state leeislator... he nowwhostt the c-4 radio show in baltiiore.dee. keiffer kennedys,' what e had termed "the mitcheels, to a certain royaltyy"his son spoke abouu him today on the radii, &pfittingly channeliig bobby pennedy.c4 on radio:: &chhanelinn bobby kknnedy) "ddn't make my father larger actually was. he saw wrong and triid to right it. he saw pain ann tried to heal it. and, he saw racism and tried to stop it."mitchell was 72 years old. paul gessler, fox45 news at ten. ffneral plans.... have... not yet... been madee 3 3 &p3 &p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 &p3 i got my obamaphone obamaphooe i got my ob
. >> affirmative action, civil rights group rally as the supreme court revisit also race can be a factor in college admissions. and won't you be my neighbor? late night's jimmy fallon visits mr. romney's neighborhood. >> it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood. beautiful day for a neighbor. would you be mine? could you be mine? hello, neighbor. you see this? it's called a wallet. inside of a wallet, oh, that's where money goes. now, do you know what money is? i'm guessing no, because you're watching public television. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the house republican hearings on last month's terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi are under way now on capitol hill. chairman darrell issa opened the hearings demanding answers from the state department about their response to the incident. as well as the amount of security personnel in place before september 11th. >> we know that the tragedy in benghazi ended as it did. we now know that, in fact, it was caused by a terrorist attack that wasp reasonably predictable to eventually happen somewhere in the world, especia
. >>> a muslim civil rights group based in washington launched a new campaign today in response to anti-jihad ads that went up this week in several metro stations. those ads are sponsored by the american freedom defense initiative. it compares muslim extremists to savages. the council on american islamic relations said its counterad sends a positive message. >> this ad starts with this from the koran. show forgiveness, speak for justice and avoid ignorant. we want to reintroduce civility and values to uplift the spirit of americans and to the mind of those who watch the campaign, to speak up. >> the 16-foot banners will go up next week in stations that feature the other ads and stay up for a month. >>> probably no surprise to commuters, the d.c. area has some of the worst traffic in the entire country. adam tuss got an update on some projects aimed to improve the beltway congestion. >> reporter: gas up and go. around here, it's the go that gets tough. >> i leave the house by 6:45. get on the toll road, get myself ready to spend about, what, $15 a day. it's at least 45 minutes. it's like constant
, the diversity of texas, which had affirmative flee been discriminating -- not against black people in the civil-rights era -- was made to end a black student, sort of in the brown versus board of education era. not directly relevant to the case, but it casts a shadow, and reminds us, in living memory, the that the state's affirmative it discriminated against a disadvantaged minority in the most pernicious way. the question is, how we move forward it enough away from those days for their not to be some effort at the mediation and an effort to make sure all aspects of society are represented in our student bodies. host: who are the players in this case? guest: fisher is supported by a small group from the project of fair representation, which has in many settings, including voting rights, taking conservative positions. on the university of texas aside is an avalanche of friend-of- the-court briefs. there are some on the other side, but for that way by a friend-of-the-court briefs, supported the diversity, for all aspects of society, including corporations and military leaders to take the view that it is
are the stakes here? >> the stakes are tremendous. >> reporter: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions. warning the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer, not just black and latino students. all students benefit from learning together inside the classroom and out. >> reporter: they've expressed the concern over the use of racial preferences, meaning affirmative action is very much on the line here today. the last time the court reviewed this, just as sandra day o'connor speculated, that race preferences might not be needed after 25 years. the court took this case for review just nine years after she said that. >> wyatt andrews at the supreme court. in a few minutes we'll ask texas governor rick perry about the supreme court case right here on "cbs this morning." >>> the captain of the italian cruise liner who ran aground and capsized has
, he strengthened america with the focus on federal budget, civil rights, education, and the environment. in the white house, leon panetta was director of the office of management budget and chief of staff, fostering policies that led to a balanced budget in the 1990s making america stronger. at the central intelligence agency, he enabled a spirited response to international terrorism with notable results, disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the nation's 23rd sex tear of defense, leon panetta struck a balance as a force of the advocate for efficiencies also standing resolute in favor of an adequately funded military. bens is pleased to bestow the award recognizing those outstanding americans whose contributions to the country reflect security as the total product of our economic, intellectual, moral, and military strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all
: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions, warning that the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders, and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer not just black and latino students all students benefit from learning together in the classroom and outside of the classroom. >> reporter: all the courts conservative justices expressed concern over the use of racial prejudice, affirmative action is on the line. the last time the court reviewed this, justice sandra day o'connor speculated race may not be needed after 25 years. >> thanks. in just a few minutes we'll ask texas governor rick perry about the supreme court case right here on cbs "this morning." >> the kacht that italian cruise liner that ran around and capsized has been fired. reports say francesco schettino was let go in july for disregarding company policy. he says the charges are unfound and he wants to be reinstated with back p
's 7:17 right now. back to savannah, al and matt. where is the civility? >> our democracy at work. and they are in the same party, right? >> exactly the thriller in manila though. >> exactly. >> you want a piece of this? come on. >> mr. roker, what's going on? >> i'm doing okay. let's see how the rest of us are doing weather-wise. we've got a risk of severe storms stretching from dallas all the way to chicago and minneapolis. threat of damaging winds. look at this. as we head on into tomorrow we're looking at this risk of strong storms. can you see them firing up all the way from minneapolis and back down into texas. rainfall amounts, anywhere from 2 to 4 inches of rain, from oklahoma city all the way up to milwaukee. that's what's going on around s >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >> thank you. barbra streisand is one of the world's most successful performers entertaining all around the globe and never in her hometown of brooklyn, until now. nbc's mara schiavocampo is live with more. mara, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. last night this place was packed with
thought many long, hard court battles throughout the civil rights era to make sure these groups would not have to disclose their donors to people. so melanie is right that it's odd we are requiring disclosure of little amounts given to candidates, but not large amounts not given to candidates. i am open to adjustments on those. there can be a lot of changes made in offense, but i think there is a fundamental difference there. there has not been a retreat for disclosure. we have never had before in our countries history, tracking people's political activity. he might jump in there. one of the thing that comes to mind is the game has changed, so has the ability to turn around disclosure itemization quickly. that's one of the things that's happening. >> iowa to talk about the irs. i like talking about boring subjects attempt to beat me down like a path that could never get out of. it is supposed to regulate social welfare nonprofits. social welfare nonprofits, 501-c4 groups come in the whole idea of dark money, their primary purpose is supposed to be social welfare, right? they're suppos
with add missions policies. as the court has interpreted title vi, the civil rights act of 1964, the private universities have to follow whatever the supreme court says with respect to public universities. and so this is often misunderstood as only affecting public universities. but title vi leverages the effect of this to private universities as well. >> everyone gets affected ultimately. good to see you. thanks for coming in. >> thanks for having me. >>> in our next hour former ohio congressman dennis kucinich joins me live. we're going to talk about cutting entitlements while ensuring the survival of medicare. ase in clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a difference in the lives of others. let's get started at capella.edu [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] ♪ >>> welcome to "weekends with
folks lived the civil rights movement. i hope it happens there. at
. >> on that one? on the issue of civil rights? >> i will absolutely differ from my party. i am pro-choice candidate, i believe in equal rights for all. i would have voted to repeal don't ask, don't tell. i don't think we should have discrimination in the military, the workplace or anywhere. >> our next question is to mr. murphy. >> knowing that voters form their opinions based on political ads, how can you justify airing ads that in some cases have been determined by fact checkers to be misleading, confusing, and downright inaccurate? >> the ads that you see on tv for me right now are me in my kitchen talking to voters directly about the differences between me and linda mcmahon on critical issues. i support a middle-class tax cut. when the mcmahon includes a tax cut for the very wealthy. when history is standing up for the people in the state, whether it's taking homeless veterans of the street and giving them housing or fighting for the most vulnerable and the roof over their head because of a disability or mental illness. linda mcmahon has used her job a very different way, going
of the people who affected the civil rights movement, for example, never held elected office. you look at people who were advocates for women's suffrage or a women's right to vote, they were never elected to office. i think it's instilling that motivation in young people, look, this is your opportunity in your forum. you don't have to have a lot of money. you don't have to be famous to build a movement behind an issue you think is important. and waywire is that platform to allow them to do it. this election obviously will be impacted by the young people who show up or don't show up in an election. but i think what's important is you've got to get more people involved in the process and educated. and the other thing that waywire is a much more serious social video platform. it's not just funny youtube videos or clips. it's actually a serious discussion about issues of the day. >> then we definitely are not interested. brian? we like the funny video. >> a lot of focus obviously on the yankees, but i want to talk about a different sport, hockey. you guys build this beautiful arena in newark, it emp
, and such unlawful practice in 2b would have been a violation of the civil rights act of 1964, and the equal employment opportunity act. those things would have immediately discouraged anybody from hiring anyone because they would have been sued no matter what. this kind of stuff is outrageously bad government by any standard whether you're a democrat or republican. it doesn't make any sense. >> steve, ron baron is standing by. he's been a long-term investor and he's got a question for you as well. ron? >> hi, steve. thanks for coming on the show. >> hi, ron. it's a pleasure. nice to see you. >> great to see you, too. so i've been friends with steve and i have invested with steve since 1980 and we were one of the first investors, one of the first three investors in wynn resorts in 19 -- in 2001, 2000-2001, market cap was then $1 billion. and one of the things that was interesting to me, we went out to visit you and we stayed in your home that night and went to a show at the bellagio and we were talking through the bellagio and we saw one person after another who worked there would keep comin
called the meds extreme. in 2009 the court ruled that new haven connecticut violated the civil rights five-year fighters after the results of a promotion exam because not enough blacks had passed. with liberal leaning justice elena kagan reducing herself a key vote could apply again with justice anthony kennedy as we heard from adam. sandy a democrat. what do you think? >> caller: yes. >> host: what do you think of affirmative action in this case specifically for the court? >> caller: well, first of all i would like to hear the make up and see the makeup of the total top ten when she was denied because we so often have not only racial problems, we can have gender problems as well. so before i want to -- before we get into a big hassle about affirmative action and how we as black people or we as white people as a minority, we are not able to have a fair shot in getting into that college and also listening to the case may be they may need to reform. the racial ethnic of the and a graduate student body this is the university of texas, you can see the makeup in 2010, 2007 over 50% white.
america with his focus on budget, civil rights education and the environment. in the white house he served as director of the office of management budget and his chief of staff brought policies that brought a balanced budget in the 1990's making america stronger. he enabled a response to international terrorism with notable results disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the 2323rd secretary of defense he sought efficient sis while standing resslute in fafere of an adequately funded military. we are pleased to bestow the 2011 award recognizing those outstanding americans who is contributions to the country of security as the total product of our economic intellectual moral strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that serve in our military. bruce, my greatest thanks to you for your kind remarks and your leadership here. and i accept this a
, with civil unions, i would support repealing the marriage yet giving civil-rights to those who are of same-sex orientation. >> i support marriage equality. i was on an airplane last spring when i -- when a man sitting next to me started a conversation and said that he recruits for new hampshire's business and marriage equality is a major recruitment tool for him because people are going to our state because we want to include all people of talent and energy in our economy. on this, along with the issues surrounding women's health care, women's access to cancer screening and the funding of planned parenthood has extreme agenda pin he will sign those bills should they come to his desk as gov.. >> i think the record is very clear as far as what the agenda should be. it should be about jobs and the economy. that is what people have said in this state. that is the focus i will bring. i will be a leader for a change here in new hampshire, working with our legislature to get a right agenda set and the right agenda is about jobs and the economy. >> earlier this evening, a coin flip was held to see
and by the way the civil rights act secured passage for it but democrats have co-opted that narrative and we have got to seize control of that so when black republicans come out and say hey, you know, i'm exercising my first amendment right, we get slammed. we get put back in what i call the black box. and, you know what? i never read the black memo that said i have to be a democrat and it's -- >> -- it's crazy. >> i didn't get that one. >> crystal rice thanks so much for coming in and sharing your experience about. this we appreciate it more "fox & friends" in a few minutes. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communit
's equality. civil society is wise to remain vigilant and to exercise their hard-earned rights to safeguard their new democracy. like the hundreds of tunisian women who recently took to the streets to protest on behalf of a woman charged with indecency after she was raped by a police officer. these competing visions of tunisia's future were put to the test. violent extremists attacked the u.s. embassy in tunis and burn the american school nearby. how did the good the tunisian people in government respond? first, the government increase increased security around our embassy and promised to assist with repairs to the school, which they have done. then they publicly committed to confront violent groups and prevent tunisia from becoming a safe haven for international terrorism. following through on these pledges is essential. those responsible for the attacks must be brought to justice. the government must provide security for diplomatic missions and create a secure environment for foreign residents and visitors, and the rule of law must extend to everyone throughout the country. the country's
, civil disobedience. i'm selling it 'cause you say i can't. all right? nobody is going to obey that law. nor should they. but the foreign car industry, bye. bye. if they ever ruled that, audi, bmw, mercedes, honda, see you! so ford and gm, they're probably, yes! yes! >> i got a ford explorer. >> little garage sales. >> bill: you ladies finished? good. jessica's law. everybody knows "the factor" is behind it. new jersey looks like they've got it going. >> passed through the senate. it's now in the assembly. so it hasn't passed yet, but it looks like it may be close to patsing. >> bill: this is nothing. it takes like four months -- >> but it's taken seven years. >> bill: once we went after new jersey, they kicked it into high gear and now we expect chris christie to sign it. >> yes. >> bill: in new york where we are right now, you call governor cuomo today, right? >> at this. i called his spokesperson. no response. >> bill: no response? who is the spokesperson? >> richard bamburger. >> bill: and he wouldn't -- >> wouldn't respond. when i first called, i was told he was in a meeting for ha
in the middle east. up next, the talks about syria's civil war, iran's nuclear program. my interview with the republican presidential nominee continues right after this. ♪ ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. perform, compete and grow. and people are driving this change. that's the power of human resources. the society... for human resource management and its members know... how to harness that power, because we help develop it. from the next economy, to the next generation, we help get... the most out of business, by getting the best out of people. shrm. leading people, leading organizations. >>> more now from my interview with republican presidential nominee mitt romney. i asked him about the very dangerous didn'tments taking place in the middle east right now. >> in syria you said you would identify members of the opposition and ensure they obtain arms to defeat al assad's tanks. how do you make sure those weapons don't get into the hands of terrorists or al qaeda? >> well, wolf, this is part
't rely on agencies that were once never perfect? >> that is right. i was always something. what the government is trying to measure a gigantic economy. the civil servants are working hard at this. a number of different administrations, 83 out of 84 have been questioned by wall street analysts. earlier in the year, they advise the analyst is as they don't look at the weekly revisions. use again the four-week moving average, which we are seeing in those numbers, 362,000, that is the lowest drop -- the biggest drop in about six months. that tends to smooth out and knock out things, rather than temporary automotive factory shutdowns and the like three. lou: what we saw smooth out they were those indexes. the markets. the markets are just rebelling. we watched today, and the professional money in there. let's be very clear about this. these are the professionals going back, saying that we don't want the numbers on earnings, we don't like what we are seeing along the bottom of this market, and we don't like the fact that we get a big number in the morning from the labor department and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)